Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
have ignition, four, three, two, one, zero. we have lit off. it is lighting up the sky. >>neil: apollo 17 was on the way to the noon 40 years ago carried the men who would be the last human beings to walk on the moon, 40 years after we conquered the stars, why open earth can we just grow on a damn budget? i cannot plain washington, dc. i can explain, now, the folks would make them look very small, the heroes, actually, who brought us to the moon and did the impossible, remember now, 40 years after that last mission to the moon surface that anything is possible. i don't want to give away our sunday night "fly me to the moon" special but i want to give you a teaser, what made them so special. >> we are not thinking about what goes wrong, worry is a wasted emotion. it clouds clear thinking that is absolutely needed when something is wrong. >> i didn't have guts i knew what i was doing. i didn't go to the moon not to come back. >>neil: did you think you might die? >> we thought our chances were about 10 percent. >>neil: did you hear that? 10 percent. one out of ten chance of coming out tha
to try not to. think of being jim lovell from apollo 13 afford to was special the 40th anniversary of the last lunar landing and the one flight that did not make it. but outshone many people for how they handled the crisis. >> the crew of apollo 13. >> 56 hours into the flight the finished broadcast showing how comfortably they lived and worked. >> we will get back to a pleasant evening. >> nine minutes later oxygen tank number two blew up causing the number one tank to fail. >> houston we have a problem. forever linked to commander jim lovell. >> when the explosion occurred why not apollo 12414? i could not believe what was happening. then i said it is me. it is now. what i n
and also recovered the apollo ast astronauts before being retired in 1970. but other historic ships around the country, the yorktown is in need of costly repairs. >> the wear and tear from the salt water. >> reporter: rasing repair money for these privately run museum ships is a huge challenge. >> when you're looking at tens of millions of dolla that it will take to restore the uss yorktown, you can't sell enough t-shirts to make that happen. >> reporter: already a dozen historic ships have been lost. this ship, a cold war era submarine now in danger of toppling over. repairing it will cost more than $3 million. so chances are unless there's a big donation, it will be sunk at sea, closing another chapter in u.s. history. >> if they did away with all the museums, it would be like getting rid of the battle field, whether, you know, like gt gettiesberg, vix vicksburg. >> and other ships face the ravages of time. mark potter, nbc news, charleston. >>> that's nbc nightly news on this sunday. brian williams will be up tomorrow. i'm lester holt reporting from los angeles for all of us at nbc news
thought to myself, why me? why didn't i go on apollo 12 or wait to apollo 14. for a little while i couldn't believe what was happening and then all of a sudden i said, well it is me and it is now. so what's next? jon: jim lovell, one of my all-time heroes. you can catch the entire documentary, fox news reporting, fly me to the moon, airing this sunday 9:00 p.m. eastern time right here on fox news channel. heather: i will definitely tune in for that. that is a good one. you heard of pacemakers for the heart but how about one for the brain? a promises new break through offering hope to alzheimer's patients. >>> plus how do you like your cup of joe? these elephants help make one of the world's most exotic coffees. 50 bucks a serving. the coffee beans, that's a whole different story. stay tuned. ligations, but oblig. ligations, but oblig. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock.
that reality, but the fact of the matter is 40 years ago today, apollo 17 took off, our last mission to the moon. the last time human beings were to set foot on the lune nare -- lunar surface. back then, we ownedded the space race. anything was possible. we were reaching for the stars. forty decembers later, we can't reach a stupid budget accord. what happened to us? from owning space to hitching rides with the russians just to get into space. it's all part of the special we're planning on fox news, 9 # p.m. sunday. it's a chance for you to find out the real meaning of fly me to the moon, a time when we did set a goal and meet it and never said "couldn't" or "can't," and these exclusive interviews with the heros that got us there speak about a time and a place when america ruled the world. take a peek. >> the commander of a flight has the power to abort it; right? >> when you launch, the commander, dave scott in our case -- >> liftoff. >> something goes wrong, and it veers here and there, we had several modes of abort to use. just twist a handle and we'd abort. we held his hand. say,
of dollars from apollo, you can do it for less money now. but you keep the dollars going for new technologies, things that are harder to do, things that we couldn't do in the '60s and '70s, and '80s and build some of these new boosters. then you will do what nasa perhaps always intended to do, go beyond the edge and create a base of technology that someone else can come by and do space taxis to orbit or to the moon and private access. that is a sign of what they should be doing in the future, which is keep pushing new technologies, keep the funding high enough to keep the right people working there. >> that's a key, isn't it, jim? i mean, it was kind of a cool thing. i mean, when you got into space engineering, i mean, if you told somebody you worked at nasa or for heaven's sake, you were an astronaut, it was a really cool job. is the problem now that space travel and nasa isn't so cool anymore? how do you keep that moving forward? >> it's a problem around the world. the u.s. does not have that problem. the best and brightest still want to come work on the space program, either for nasa or ot
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)